KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
KOPF HOCH! MUT HOCH! UND HUMOR HOCH!, 2017
exhibition view
DAAD Galerie Berlin

"Rayyane Tabet’s solo show at the daadgalerie is the first part of a project[i] based on Tabet’s long-term research into Max Freiherr von Oppenheim’s excavations at Tell Halaf. Documents and photographs from Tabet’s family provided the first impetus to this research—his great-grandfather, Faek Borkhoche, was secretary and translator to Max von Oppenheim[ii] during his third expedition to northeastern Syria in 1929.
Beginning in 1911, excavations were conducted there unveiling spectacular palaces, tombs, and crypts from the Aramaic and Neo-Assyrian period. However, after dividing the finds up with the Syrian directorate of antiquities in 1927, Oppenheim was unsuccessful in securing a location for his portion of the finds in the second Pergamon Museum, which was under construction at the time. As a result, he then founded his own private Tell Halaf Museum in a former factory building on Franklinstraße in Berlin- Charlottenburg, which opened in 1930 but was destroyed in 1943 by an incendiary bomb. The exhibits were burned or were shattered during fire-fighting operations. The remnants of the basalt sculptures and reliefs, a total of around 27,000 fragments, were brought to the cellar of the Pergamon Museum during the war and only reconstructed seventy years later after nearly ten years of painstaking work by archaeologists and conservators from the Museum for Ancient Near Eastern Cultures at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In 2011, they were shown publicly for the first time in an exhibition at the Pergamon Museum."



excerpt from DAAD Galerie press release