"William Turner, Sun Setting over a Lake, Venice 1840", 2007
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Venice, Düsseldorf,
LED light box, 91 x 122,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"William Turner, Sun Setting over a Lake, Venice 1840", 2007
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Venice, Düsseldorf,
LED light box, 91 x 122,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"William Turner, Stonehenge, 1836", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 27,9 x40,4 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"William Turner, Stonehenge, 1836", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 27,9 x40,4 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.1, 1834", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.1, 1834", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

02HM.jpg

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

02HM.jpg
02HM.jpg

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.2, 1834", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.2, 1834", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.3, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.3, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Ehrenbreitstein No.01, 1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Koblenz
LED light box, 24,9 x 34 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Ehrenbreitstein No.01, 1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Koblenz
LED light box, 24,9 x 34 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.4, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.4, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,2 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Ehrenbreitstein No.02, 1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Koblenz
LED light box, 24 x 30,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Ehrenbreitstein No.02, 1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Koblenz
LED light box, 24 x 30,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Heidelberg, 1846", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, Location: Heidelberg
LED light box, 37,4 x 55,3 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Heidelberg, 1846", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, Location: Heidelberg
LED light box, 37,4 x 55,3 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, frontview,1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23,1 x 28,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, frontview,1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23,1 x 28,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, side view,1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, side view,1841", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Location: Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Arth on the Lake of Zug, Early Morning, Sample Study, 1842-3", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,8 x 29 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Arth on the Lake of Zug, Early Morning, Sample Study, 1842-3", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,8 x 29 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Küssnacht, Lake of Lucerne, Sample Study, 1842-3", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,8 x 29 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Küssnacht, Lake of Lucerne, Sample Study, 1842-3", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,8 x 29 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Blue Rigi, Sunrise, 1842", 2008
composite image consisting of 280 photographs, Location: Luzern
LED light box, 29,7 x 45 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Blue Rigi, Sunrise, 1842", 2008
composite image consisting of 280 photographs, Location: Luzern
LED light box, 29,7 x 45 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Red Rigi, Sunset, 1842", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 30,5 x 45,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Red Rigi, Sunset, 1842", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 30,5 x 45,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Devils Bridge near Andermatt, 1802", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, Andermatt
LED light box, 47,1 x 31,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Devils Bridge near Andermatt, 1802", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, Andermatt
LED light box, 47,1 x 31,8 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Passage of Mount St Gothard, taken from the center of the Teufels Bruch, 1804", 2008
composite image consisting of 280 photographs, Andermatt
LED light box, 101 x 68 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"The Passage of Mount St Gothard, taken from the center of the Teufels Bruch, 1804", 2008
composite image consisting of 280 photographs, Andermatt
LED light box, 101 x 68 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Sion, Rhone, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Sion
LED light box, 24,5 x 27,7 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Sion, Rhone, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Sion
LED light box, 24,5 x 27,7 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Monte Rosa, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 200 photographs, Zwermatt
LED light box, 24,3 x 33,9 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Monte Rosa, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 200 photographs, Zwermatt
LED light box, 24,3 x 33,9 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap

In his new body of works Hiroyuki Masuyama approaches the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) and of James Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) using the medium of photography. The Japanese concept artist H.M. whose work has always been based on a compilation of many images honours both artists who did not paint landscapes in a realistic manner but composed them from several elements to create an idealistic site. Hiroyuki Masuyama located landscapes similar to the ones painted in the beginning of the 19th century and took around one thousand photos of several sites. He then compiled around 1000 photos to one mounted image and recreated the paintings in every detail, giving special attention to the pictorial atmosphere. Then the works were produced as lightboxes in the size of the original paintings. Even in his early photo and video works Hiroyuki Masuyama played with the concept of time and space. Masuyama tries to resume in one work the past, the present and the future. Time is important to him as the eternal cycle and the state of permanence. He takes for example one photo every day at the same time over one year, moving his camera one meter or turning it 1° . He then puts all 365 photos in a computer mounting one strip of each photo. The result is a lightbox of 30 x 15 x 200 cm showing a panorama view over 365 days. Also his sky panoramas are more than simple landscapes: During his flights Masuyama makes one photo every 20 seconds. Hundreds of pictures are then mounted to one whole journey. Similar to a painter, who is painting his view of an idealistic mountain on a blank canvas, the artist tries to leave the reality behind - in a way to take the viewer to a land of dreams, memory and fantasy. Through the perfect connection of the pictures Hiroyuki Masuyama creates a silent poetry of sensuality, which in its whole complexity is visible not until the second view.

"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, side view, 1841",2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"Falls of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, side view, 1841",2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Schaffhausen
LED light box, 23 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"Mont Blanc, from Brévent, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Chamonnix
LED light box, 25,6 x 28 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"Mont Blanc, from Brévent, 1836", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Chamonnix
LED light box, 25,6 x 28 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"Looking east from the Giudecca, Sunrise, 1842", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22,4 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"Looking east from the Giudecca, Sunrise, 1842", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22,4 x 28,6 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"San Giorgio Maggiore at Sunset, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of 200 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22 x 32 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"San Giorgio Maggiore at Sunset, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of 200 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22 x 32 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Giudecca Canal, looking towards Santa Maria della Salute, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22,2 x 32,1 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Giudecca Canal, looking towards Santa Maria della Salute, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of 150 photographs, Venice
LED light box, 22,2 x 32,1 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Grand Canal by the Salute, Venice, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,1 x 32,1 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Grand Canal by the Salute, Venice, 1840", 2008
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 22,1 x 32,1 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Doge's Palace and the Piazzetta, 1840", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 24 x 30,4 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Doge's Palace and the Piazzetta, 1840", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 24 x 30,4 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"William Turner, Ancient Italy, Ovid banished from Rome, 1838", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 94,6 x 125 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Ancient Italy, Ovid banished from Rome, 1838", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 94,6 x 125 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
28HM.jpg
28HM.jpg
28HM.jpg
"William Turner, Ancient Rome, Agrippina Landing with the Ashes of Germanicus, 1835", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 91,5 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Ancient Rome, Agrippina Landing with the Ashes of Germanicus, 1835", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 91,5 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Arch of Constantine, Rome 1835", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 91 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Arch of Constantine, Rome 1835", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 91 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.6, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.6, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.7, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.7, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.5, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"The Burning of the Houses of Parliament No.5, 1834", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs, Location: London
LED light box, 23,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
MapTravel.jpg
MapTravel.jpg
MapTravel.jpg
"Turner, Fisherman on the Lagoon, Moonlight, 1840"
2010, 19,2 x 28 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Fisherman on the Lagoon, Moonlight, 1840"
2010, 19,2 x 28 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, San Giorgio Maggiore from the Hotel Europa, at the Entrance to the Grand Canal, 1840"
2010, 19,5 x 27,6 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, San Giorgio Maggiore from the Hotel Europa, at the Entrance to the Grand Canal, 1840"
2010, 19,5 x 27,6 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking down the Grand Canal to Palazzo Corner della Ca'Grande and Santa Maria della Salute
2010, 22,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking down the Grand Canal to Palazzo Corner della Ca'Grande and Santa Maria della Salute
2010, 22,1 x 32,5 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Strom at the Mouth of the Grand Canal, 1840"
2010, 21,8 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Strom at the Mouth of the Grand Canal, 1840"
2010, 21,8 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, The Rialto Bridge from the North, 1840"
2010, 22,7 x 30,2 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, The Rialto Bridge from the North, 1840"
2010, 22,7 x 30,2 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Venice by Moonlight, 1840"
2010, 22 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Venice by Moonlight, 1840"
2010, 22 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED
"William Turner, Modern Rome, 1839", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 90,2 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Modern Rome, 1839", 2008
composite image consisting of 250 photographs, location: Rome
LED light box, 90,2 x 122 x 4,08 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
" Turner, Venice looking towards the Dogana and San Giorgio Maggiore, with a Storm Approaching, 1840
2010, 22 x 32 x 4 cm, LED
" Turner, Venice looking towards the Dogana and San Giorgio Maggiore, with a Storm Approaching, 1840
2010, 22 x 32 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Santa Maria della Salute from the Bacino, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,7 x 4 cm, LED Kopie
"Turner, Santa Maria della Salute from the Bacino, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,7 x 4 cm, LED Kopie
"Turner, The Upper End of the Grand Canal, with San Simeone Piccolo, Dusk 1840"
2010, 21,9 x 32 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, The Upper End of the Grand Canal, with San Simeone Piccolo, Dusk 1840"
2010, 21,9 x 32 x 4 cm, LED
SunsetoverSantamaria.jpg
SunsetoverSantamaria.jpg
SunsetoverSantamaria.jpg
"Turner, Storm at Sunset 1840"
2010 22,2 x 32 x 4 cm, LED 2
"Turner, Storm at Sunset 1840"
2010 22,2 x 32 x 4 cm, LED 2
The Zitelle, Santa Maria della Salute, the Camanile ans San Giorgio Maggiore, from the Canale della
The Zitelle, Santa Maria della Salute, the Camanile ans San Giorgio Maggiore, from the Canale della
The Zitelle, Santa Maria della Salute, the Camanile ans San Giorgio Maggiore, from the Canale della
"Turner, Boats on the Lagoon, near Venice, 1840"
2010, 24,6 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Boats on the Lagoon, near Venice, 1840"
2010, 24,6 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking across the Bacino di San Marco at Sunset, from near San Biagio, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking across the Bacino di San Marco at Sunset, from near San Biagio, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking across the Lagoon at Sunset, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking across the Lagoon at Sunset, 1840"
2010, 24,4 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking along the Riva degli Schiavoni, from near the Rio dell'Arsenale, 1840"
24,6 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking along the Riva degli Schiavoni, from near the Rio dell'Arsenale, 1840"
24,6 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking up the Giudecca Canal, with Santa Maria della Salute on the Right 1840"
2010, 25,5 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Looking up the Giudecca Canal, with Santa Maria della Salute on the Right 1840"
2010, 25,5 x 30,4 x 4 cm, LED
" Turner, Looking back on Venice from the Canale di San Marcoto the East, 1840"
2010, 24,5 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED Kopie.jpg
" Turner, Looking back on Venice from the Canale di San Marcoto the East, 1840"
2010, 24,5 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED Kopie.jpg
Turner, Palazzo Balbi on the Grand Canal
Turner, Palazzo Balbi on the Grand Canal
Turner, Palazzo Balbi on the Grand Canal
03HM.jpg
03HM.jpg
03HM.jpg
"William Turner, View from Richmond Hill, 1815", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 18,8 x 27,2 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
"William Turner, View from Richmond Hill, 1815", 2009
composite image consisting of many photographs
LED light box, 18,8 x 27,2 x 4 cm, Ed. 7+1ap
01HM.jpg
01HM.jpg
01HM.jpg
04HM.jpg
04HM.jpg
04HM.jpg
05HM.jpg
05HM.jpg
05HM.jpg
06HM.jpg
06HM.jpg
06HM.jpg
07HM.jpg
07HM.jpg
07HM.jpg
08HM.jpg
08HM.jpg
08HM.jpg
09HM.jpg
09HM.jpg
09HM.jpg
10HM.jpg
10HM.jpg
10HM.jpg
11HM.jpg
11HM.jpg
11HM.jpg
12HM.jpg
12HM.jpg
12HM.jpg
13HM.jpg
13HM.jpg
13HM.jpg
14HM.jpg
14HM.jpg
14HM.jpg
15HM.jpg
15HM.jpg
15HM.jpg
16HM.jpg
16HM.jpg
16HM.jpg
18HM.jpg
18HM.jpg
18HM.jpg
17HM.jpg
17HM.jpg
17HM.jpg
19HM.jpg
19HM.jpg
19HM.jpg
20HM.jpg
20HM.jpg
20HM.jpg
21HM.jpg
21HM.jpg
21HM.jpg
22HM.jpg
22HM.jpg
22HM.jpg
23HM.jpg
23HM.jpg
23HM.jpg
24HM.jpg
24HM.jpg
24HM.jpg
25HM.jpg
25HM.jpg
25HM.jpg
27HM.jpg
27HM.jpg
27HM.jpg
28HM.jpg
28HM.jpg
28HM.jpg
AncientItaly.jpg
AncientItaly.jpg
AncientItaly.jpg
AncientRome.jpg
AncientRome.jpg
AncientRome.jpg
ArchofConstantine.jpg
ArchofConstantine.jpg
ArchofConstantine.jpg
houseparl6.jpg
houseparl6.jpg
houseparl6.jpg
houseparl7.jpg
houseparl7.jpg
houseparl7.jpg
houseparl9.jpg
houseparl9.jpg
houseparl9.jpg
Travel Map
Travel Map
Travel Map
Masuyama, Turner, Looking down the Grand Canal to Palazzo Corner della Ca'Grande and Santa Maria del
Masuyama, Turner, Looking down the Grand Canal to Palazzo Corner della Ca'Grande and Santa Maria del
Masuyama, Turner, Looking down the Grand Canal to Palazzo Corner della Ca'Grande and Santa Maria del
Masuyama, Turner, Strom at the Mouth of the Grand Canal, 1840, 2010, 21,8 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED, Kopie.
Masuyama, Turner, Strom at the Mouth of the Grand Canal, 1840, 2010, 21,8 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED, Kopie.
Masuyama, Turner, Strom at the Mouth of the Grand Canal, 1840, 2010, 21,8 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED, Kopie.
Masuyama, Turner, Venice by Moonlight, 1840, 2010, 22 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, Venice by Moonlight, 1840, 2010, 22  x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, Venice by Moonlight, 1840, 2010, 22 x 31,9 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, The Rialto Bridge from the North, 1840, 2010, 22,7 x 30,2 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, The Rialto Bridge from the North, 1840, 2010, 22,7 x 30,2 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, The Rialto Bridge from the North, 1840, 2010, 22,7 x 30,2 x 4 cm, LED.jpg
Masuyama, Turner, The Upper End of the Grand Canal, with San Simeone Piccolo, Dusk 1840, 2010, 21,9
Masuyama, Turner, The Upper End of the Grand Canal, with San Simeone Piccolo, Dusk 1840, 2010, 21,9
Masuyama, Turner, The Upper End of the Grand Canal, with San Simeone Piccolo, Dusk 1840, 2010, 21,9
"William Turner, A Wreck", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice, Rom
LED light box, 180 x 256 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, A Wreck", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice, Rom
LED light box, 180 x 256 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Red Sky over a Beach, 1835-40", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Düsseldorf, Venice,
LED light box, 180 x 290 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Red Sky over a Beach, 1835-40", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Düsseldorf, Venice,
LED light box, 180 x 290 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Cockermouth Castle, 1830", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice
LED light box, 180 x 256 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Cockermouth Castle, 1830", 2008
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice
LED light box, 180 x 256 x 6 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Festive Lagoon Scene, Venice 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 91 x 121 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Festive Lagoon Scene, Venice 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 91 x 121 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Procession of Boats with Distant Smoke, Venice 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 90 x 120,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Procession of Boats with Distant Smoke, Venice 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 90 x 120,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Venetian Festival 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 72,5 x 113,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"William Turner, Venetian Festival 1845", 2007
composite image consisting of 300 photographs, location: Venice,
LED light box, 72,5 x 113,5 x 4 cm, Ed. 5+1ap
"Turner, Shipping off the Riva degli Schiavoni, fr9om near the Ponte dell'Arsenale, 1840"
2010, 20,3 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED
"Turner, Shipping off the Riva degli Schiavoni, fr9om near the Ponte dell'Arsenale, 1840"
2010, 20,3 x 30,6 x 4 cm, LED