Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec

The grandfather’s biography:
The grandfather (Hussein Mroue?) was born in 1907 or 1908 in Haddatha, in the south of Lebanon. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born in 1910. His father was a sheikh, who sent him to Iraq in order to study to become a sheikh himself, and eventually inherit his position. This took place in 1924. Some time later, in 1948, while continuing his studies in Iraq, Mroue? met one of the founders of the Iraqi Communist Party, who offered him a copy of the Communist Manifesto. This was his first acquaintance with Marxist thought, and it opened the door to other philosophies and cultures. The Communist Manifesto acted as a catalyst, which awakened Mroue? to the concepts of human and social equality, especially at the time of the socio-political crisis engendered by British policies in Iraq. This also coincided with the declaration of the state of Israel, and the suffering and deportation of the Palestinian people. Mroue? took part, as a thinker and journalist and activist, in the struggle of the Iraqi people against British politics, which led to the failure of the Portsmouth agreement. A year later, in 1949, the Iraqi government kicked Mroue? out of the country, and revoked his nationality and that of his family.
He returned to Lebanon, became one of the most renowned Arab Marxist thinkers, and was a member of the central committee of the Lebanese Communist Party. His main center of activity revolved around thinking and writing; he wrote many books on the subjects of Arabic literature, politics, Islam, and philosophy. His last project dealt with the subject of materialistic tendencies in Islamic philosophy. He published two substantial volumes on this subject, which were considered highly controversial at the time, and caused heated debate. He was writing the third volume of this project, when two Islamic fundamentalists barged into his house, went into the bedroom, and shot him with a silenc- er. He was in his eighties, at the time. This took place on February 17, 1987 during the civil war. This was a troubled period for the country of Lebanon; the government was almost non-existent, and as a result there was no investigation into Mroue?’s murder. Like all similar cases in Lebanon, it was shut down immediately, and never spoken about since then.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec

The grandfather’s biography:
The grandfather (Hussein Mroue?) was born in 1907 or 1908 in Haddatha, in the south of Lebanon. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born in 1910. His father was a sheikh, who sent him to Iraq in order to study to become a sheikh himself, and eventually inherit his position. This took place in 1924. Some time later, in 1948, while continuing his studies in Iraq, Mroue? met one of the founders of the Iraqi Communist Party, who offered him a copy of the Communist Manifesto. This was his first acquaintance with Marxist thought, and it opened the door to other philosophies and cultures. The Communist Manifesto acted as a catalyst, which awakened Mroue? to the concepts of human and social equality, especially at the time of the socio-political crisis engendered by British policies in Iraq. This also coincided with the declaration of the state of Israel, and the suffering and deportation of the Palestinian people. Mroue? took part, as a thinker and journalist and activist, in the struggle of the Iraqi people against British politics, which led to the failure of the Portsmouth agreement. A year later, in 1949, the Iraqi government kicked Mroue? out of the country, and revoked his nationality and that of his family.
He returned to Lebanon, became one of the most renowned Arab Marxist thinkers, and was a member of the central committee of the Lebanese Communist Party. His main center of activity revolved around thinking and writing; he wrote many books on the subjects of Arabic literature, politics, Islam, and philosophy. His last project dealt with the subject of materialistic tendencies in Islamic philosophy. He published two substantial volumes on this subject, which were considered highly controversial at the time, and caused heated debate. He was writing the third volume of this project, when two Islamic fundamentalists barged into his house, went into the bedroom, and shot him with a silenc- er. He was in his eighties, at the time. This took place on February 17, 1987 during the civil war. This was a troubled period for the country of Lebanon; the government was almost non-existent, and as a result there was no investigation into Mroue?’s murder. Like all similar cases in Lebanon, it was shut down immediately, and never spoken about since then.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec


The father’s biography:
The father (Ahmad Mroue?) was born in 1935 in Najaf, in the south of Iraq, where his father (the grandfather) was studying to become a sheikh. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born in Beirut on January 5, 1935. He returned to Lebanon in 1949, when his father was deported from Iraq. He married at the age of 21, to his cousin (the mother) who was 14 years old at the time. They immigrated to Sierra Leone (Africa), in 1956, where the father worked as a general trader. During this time, he became the father of five children. He spent his leisure time reading a great deal of books, mainly classical European literature and history. The father eventually came to the conclusion that trade was not his true vocation, and seeing that he had managed to put some money aside, decided to come back to Lebanon with his family, in 1965. He spends all the money he had saved on buying an apartment in Beirut, and enrolling at the American University of Beirut, to continue his studies in Physics and Mathematics. This took place in 1967. During this time, he had two more children, including the son (the author of the short story). Mroue? taught mathematics in various private and government secondary schools, and also wrote a great deal on the subject. In December 1975, he was admitted to the American University Hospital, and diagnosed with acute leukemia. He was cured after a 30-day treatment, and spent the next two years taking preventive medicine. The father retired from teaching in 1999, but went on writing nonetheless, especially on the subject of numbers and their properties. None of his articles or books was ever published.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec


The father’s biography:
The father (Ahmad Mroue?) was born in 1935 in Najaf, in the south of Iraq, where his father (the grandfather) was studying to become a sheikh. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born in Beirut on January 5, 1935. He returned to Lebanon in 1949, when his father was deported from Iraq. He married at the age of 21, to his cousin (the mother) who was 14 years old at the time. They immigrated to Sierra Leone (Africa), in 1956, where the father worked as a general trader. During this time, he became the father of five children. He spent his leisure time reading a great deal of books, mainly classical European literature and history. The father eventually came to the conclusion that trade was not his true vocation, and seeing that he had managed to put some money aside, decided to come back to Lebanon with his family, in 1965. He spends all the money he had saved on buying an apartment in Beirut, and enrolling at the American University of Beirut, to continue his studies in Physics and Mathematics. This took place in 1967. During this time, he had two more children, including the son (the author of the short story). Mroue? taught mathematics in various private and government secondary schools, and also wrote a great deal on the subject. In December 1975, he was admitted to the American University Hospital, and diagnosed with acute leukemia. He was cured after a 30-day treatment, and spent the next two years taking preventive medicine. The father retired from teaching in 1999, but went on writing nonetheless, especially on the subject of numbers and their properties. None of his articles or books was ever published.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec


The son’s biography:
The son (Rabih Mroue?) was born in Beirut on January 24, 1967, and is presently living in one of the capital’s suburbs. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born on February 21, 1967. During the long years of the Lebanese war, Mroue? found himself implicated in the latter, to varying degrees. He was a volunteer medical orderly in the war’s early stages and in 1982, during the Israeli invasion of the capital Beirut, Mroue?’s vocation altered and he became in charge of a small canon “Mortar 62”, which he never used, for technical purposes. Without reading either the Party’s manifesto or its rules of enrolment, he became a member of the Lebanese Communist Party. When he did not know what to do next, he found himself in the Lebanese University pursuing studies in Theater. In 1989, for an unknown reason he wrote a short story, which turned out his first and last one. It was during this period that he met and fell for one of his classmates, Lina Majdalanie (Saneh). They flew to Cyprus to wed, as a political statement. No one seemed to notice this statement, however; not then, not later. For a year and a half, Mroue? washed dishes in the kitchen of Canard Bleu, a fancy restaurant in Paris; and in this exquisite capital, he was introduced to the works of Bunuel, Godard, Pasolini, Tarkovsky and many others.
In 1993, he asked one of his friends, Ahmed K., for a job in Lebanon and was hired in Future TV; he worked there as a writer/director in the Animation Department from 1993 to 2008. In his free time, Mroue? taught theater. In 1999, he delved into the world of technology and acquired his own personal E-mail address: rabihm@hotmail.com.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec


The son’s biography:
The son (Rabih Mroue?) was born in Beirut on January 24, 1967, and is presently living in one of the capital’s suburbs. His identity card mistakenly states that he was born on February 21, 1967. During the long years of the Lebanese war, Mroue? found himself implicated in the latter, to varying degrees. He was a volunteer medical orderly in the war’s early stages and in 1982, during the Israeli invasion of the capital Beirut, Mroue?’s vocation altered and he became in charge of a small canon “Mortar 62”, which he never used, for technical purposes. Without reading either the Party’s manifesto or its rules of enrolment, he became a member of the Lebanese Communist Party. When he did not know what to do next, he found himself in the Lebanese University pursuing studies in Theater. In 1989, for an unknown reason he wrote a short story, which turned out his first and last one. It was during this period that he met and fell for one of his classmates, Lina Majdalanie (Saneh). They flew to Cyprus to wed, as a political statement. No one seemed to notice this statement, however; not then, not later. For a year and a half, Mroue? washed dishes in the kitchen of Canard Bleu, a fancy restaurant in Paris; and in this exquisite capital, he was introduced to the works of Bunuel, Godard, Pasolini, Tarkovsky and many others.
In 1993, he asked one of his friends, Ahmed K., for a job in Lebanon and was hired in Future TV; he worked there as a writer/director in the Animation Department from 1993 to 2008. In his free time, Mroue? taught theater. In 1999, he delved into the world of technology and acquired his own personal E-mail address: rabihm@hotmail.com.
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec
Grandfather, Father, and Son, 2010
Installation including shelves, 8000 cards, 2 copies original manuscript, vinyl wall texts and video "Checkmate", color, sound
Variable dimensions, video 18 min 30 sec