Ania Soliman, Explaining Dance to a Machine (back and forth) (side to side), 2016, pencil, encaustic, pigment on paper, 260 x 144 cm each

The dance notation drawing series, Explaining Dance to a Machine are meant to make us think about artificial intelligence. The large scale drawings are based on simple scores by Albrecht Knust, designed to teach a dance notation system invented in the 1920’s by Rudolph von Laban.

The drawings represent a schematic system designed to capture sequences of movement, a universal activity of biological entities, and make it reproducible.

Each drawing therefore represents a score that can be performed. The idea is to have the moves performed by a robot representing the current (or just-obsolete) state of robotics.

This combination of score and performance works as a metaphor for what it means to program a material entity to think, bringing up questions of how and what we communicate to the machine, but also of the programming our own embodiment.
Ania Soliman, Explaining Dance to a Machine (back and forth) (side to side), 2016, pencil, encaustic, pigment on paper, 260 x 144 cm each

The dance notation drawing series, Explaining Dance to a Machine are meant to make us think about artificial intelligence. The large scale drawings are based on simple scores by Albrecht Knust, designed to teach a dance notation system invented in the 1920’s by Rudolph von Laban.

The drawings represent a schematic system designed to capture sequences of movement, a universal activity of biological entities, and make it reproducible.

Each drawing therefore represents a score that can be performed. The idea is to have the moves performed by a robot representing the current (or just-obsolete) state of robotics.

This combination of score and performance works as a metaphor for what it means to program a material entity to think, bringing up questions of how and what we communicate to the machine, but also of the programming our own embodiment.